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What you need to know about Quebec's 2024 budget

What you need to know about Quebec's 2024 budget

Eleven billion. This is the unprecedented size of the deficit projected in the 2024-2025 budget presented by Finance Minister Eric Girard on Tuesday. Waiting for balance to return within five years, the minister has already begun to pull the scissors. Below are articles and columns that paint a picture of the situation.


Record deficit of $11 billion in Quebec

The opposition says the CAQ has “lost control of public finances”.

Six things to know about budgeting

Photo: Edward Plante Frechette, Los Angeles Press

With his sixth budget, which may be the most deficit in history, Quebec's chief financier, Eric Girard, promises to put in place a plan next year to return to the budget balance, the realization of which was postponed to 2029-2030.

With his sixth budget, which may be the most deficit in history, Quebec's chief financier, Eric Girard, promises to put in place a plan next year to return to the budget balance, the realization of which was postponed to 2029-2030. Until then, he is launching a project to “improve” government spending. Here are six things to know about a budget written in red ink.

Read the article written by Hugo Bellon Larose

What moves in your portfolio

Photo by David Boyle, Press Archive

Taxes on smokers Riding green Arrest and Optimize Your Retirement… Our journalists prepare a list of items that may threaten to shake up your investment portfolio.

Read Karim Bensissa's article

Fact Sheet by Francis Weil: What explains the record $11 billion deficit?

Photo: Edward Plante Frechette, Los Angeles Press

Tell you how surprised I am. I was expecting a dull and harsh budget, under the slogan of austerity, but this is not what Minister Eric Girard presented to us.

Columnist Francis File

Read the column by Frances Weil

Column by Marie-Eve Fournier: RRQ – Disabled seniors win their fight against Quebec

Photo by François Roy, Press Archive

Misfortunes never come singly, as disabled elderly people discover with horror on the occasion of their 65th birthday.H birthday. In addition to having to deal with an unfavorable health condition, their pension is reduced because they have not worked – or contributed – for a certain period. After 27 years, this unfair way of doing calculations will be corrected.

Columnist Marie-Eve Fournier

Read Marie-Eve Fournier's column

Fact sheet by Paul Jornet: Red Transition

Photo: Edward Plante Frechette, Los Angeles Press

Quebec Premier François Legault

There is no doubt that this is not the budget that Finance Minister Eric Girard wanted. And he wouldn't be as fond of the next people, if he was the one who left them. He stated in one sentence that the person who would replace him, when he went elsewhere, if he did of course, would be a woman. We'll see…

Columnist Paul Jornet

Read Paul Jornet's column

Editorial by Stephanie Grammon: Deception of the Finance Minister

Photo: Edward Plante Frechette, Los Angeles Press

Finance Minister Eric Girard and Quebec Premier François Legault

It happened in December. Economists and public finance experts saw nothing but fire. But with this stunt, Finance Minister Eric Girard took the liberty of taking Quebec's budget woes even further by postponing the return to a balanced budget until 2029-2030.

Editor Stephanie Grammond

Read Stephanie Grammond's op-ed

The “ambiguity” surrounding investments in public transport raises concerns

Photography by Martin Chamberland, Press

Elected municipal officials in the capital region fear that the provision of public transit services will once again be in jeopardy due to the lack of a predictable fiscal framework in Quebec's 2024 budget. Adding to their concerns are those of transportation companies, which decry the lack of “commitment” on the part of the government.

Read Bruno Marcotte's article

Subsidies for electric cars: brakes for Riding green

Photo by Patrick Sunfaun, Press Archive

The time for great subsidies for electric car buyers is coming to an end. The Quebec government announced a significant reduction in its program Riding green From next year and canceled in 2027.

Read Gabriel Belland's article

Quebec infrastructure plan: 'Hidden debt' continues to rise

Photo by David Boyle, Press Archive

The asset maintenance deficit (AMD), a kind of state “hidden debt,” continues to rise in Quebec despite record investments in infrastructure maintenance. Optimistic, the government believes it can get things back on track.

Read Gabriel Belland's article

Cleaning starts with IT and video games

Photo by Marco Campanozzi, press archive

The Legault government is offering a first glimpse of clean-up aid for the companies it prepares by reducing the generosity of tax breaks that benefit many IT and video game companies. They will have to pay tax here to be entitled to their full rights.

Read Julien Arsenault's article

Housing crisis with the absence of subscribers

Photo by David Boyle, Press Archive

With housing starts stagnating and new investment in affordable housing lacking, young people hoping to buy a home in the coming years won't find a “ray of sunshine” in Girard's budget.

Read Charles Lecavalier's article

Seniors are at the heart of health investments

Photo by Martin Chamberland, Press Archive

Health Minister Christian Dube will rely on an additional $3.7 billion over five years to “provide the best possible care for Quebecers.” Older people are at the heart of health investments, with an additional €1.1 billion allocated to maintain and improve the quality of care and services they provide.

Read Alice Girard Bossuet's article

Quebec saved half a billion dollars in wages during the strikes

Photo by David Boyle, Press Archive

The government saved more than half a billion dollars in salaries during the education strikes last fall, more than the $300 million invested in the education catch-up plan, and reveals the 2024-2025 budget presented in Quebec on Tuesday, which projects growth in Quebec. Spending reaches 7.6% on education

Read Marie-Eve Moras's article

The performing arts sector is worried, and the audiovisual sector is happy

Photo by Jacques Boissinot, Canadian Press Archives

Quebec's Minister of Culture and Communications, Mathieu Lacombe

Quebec grants French culture, heritage and language $187 million over five years. The budget worries the performing arts community, which will have to share the shrinking pie, while the audiovisual sector emerges as a winner, encouraged by tax measures requested for several months.

Read the article written by Jan Siaj and Katherine Handfield

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