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He scanned his brain when he was two years old: the “stairs” of life

He scanned his brain when he was two years old: the “stairs” of life

On January 19, 2019, little Paul's life changed, and the lives of his parents left him behind. The two-year-old had a high fever and developed convulsions, and unfortunately, the consequences were so severe that Paul would never be the same again.

He suffered severe brain trauma and had to be placed in a coma. When he finally wakes up, he doesn't remember anything. He cannot talk or walk. Even his eyes were no longer responding.

“It's hard on the parents,” said Matt Charland, Paul's father.

Paul has to learn everything again. He succeeds in overcoming trials…partially. His brain lesion is close to the speech center. Five years after this traumatic event, the boy has not yet begun to speak again. He's not quite the same anymore.

But, from the shadows, emerges this calm, cheerful personality that his parents loved so much.

“We live in a different reality,” the father explained.

Despite the pain and sadness, the parents decide to move forward, cling to life and overcome the challenges. They simply refuse to give up.

Matt is the director. He has a reaction to turning his lens on his son with a very specific idea: to show him the beauty of the world, and to help others benefit from it. The scenery is magnificent, the mountains are enormous, and the sun is majestic. However, what pleases little Paul the most, what makes him smile every time, and what attracts his attention more than anything else, is Tabarnex stairs. An inspiring documentary about a story full of hope.

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