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UK: Queen felt 'tired' after catching Govt disease

UK: Queen felt ‘tired’ after catching Govt disease

Queen Elizabeth II felt “tired” after catching COVID in February, soon after the 96-year-old king revealed during a video conference where he spoke to British caretakers who had mobilized during the epidemic.

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Elizabeth II tested positive for COVID-19 in February and delivered according to Buckingham Palace’s mild symptoms.

The virus is ‘very tired and tiring, isn’t it?’ He was speaking Wednesday at the Virtual Opening Ceremony of a care unit named after him in the British Royal London Hospital, with Asif Hussein, a former Govt patient. Capital.

Sovereignty significantly simplified its agenda from the night he was admitted to the hospital in October, before Kovid fell ill, the nature of which has never been revealed. She had retreated to Windsor Castle, about forty miles from London, where the plague had begun, and was now unable to move.

Last week, she attended a religious ceremony to pay tribute to her husband, Prince Philip, who died a year ago, marking her return to her citizens after months of absence.

At the end of the meeting with the caregivers, Elizabeth II discussed with the construction team that had set up the care unit in a few weeks to cope with the increase in the number of patients. “It’s interesting, when there’s something important, everyone works together. Wonderful, isn’t it?” Said.

Employees at Britain’s public health organization NHS are under stress during epidemics, with long shifts, respiratory equipment and the risk of catching the virus and infecting their families.

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According to official figures, 33,000 NHS medical workers left between July and September 2021, of which nearly 7,000 are looking for a better life balance. It almost doubled in the last quarter of 2019, just before the epidemic.