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NHL: AJLNH will find a successor to Donald Fehr

NHL: AJLNH will find a successor to Donald Fehr

TORONTO – The NHL Players Association will begin its search for a new CEO.

The NHLPA Executive Board announced Friday night that it has voted for a search committee to find a successor to incumbent CEO Donald Fehr, who will continue to lead the association during the search.

Fehr has led the NHLPA since December 2010 and has seen the union go through two rounds of collective bargaining, in 2013 and 2020.

Le comité est composé des joueurs actuels de la LNH Ian Cole (Hurricanes de la Caroline), Justin Faulk (Blues de St. Louis), Sam Gagner (Red Wings de Detroit), Zach Hyman (Oilers d’Edmonton), Kyle Okposo ( Sabres de Buffalo), Nate Schmidt (Jets de Winnipeg) et Kevin Shattenkirk (Ducks d’Anaheim), avec des membres supplémentaires qui peuvent être ajoutés par le conseil exécutif de l’AJLNH jusqu’à et exions du pendant ifle conse, July.

“Many players who have played in the NHL over the past eleven years greatly appreciate the significant accomplishments under Don Fehr,” a statement from the NHLPA read.

“Don joined the NHLPA after a long and successful career as CEO of Major League Baseball Players. The association quickly settled after a very difficult period. He led the NHLPA through the 2012-2013 closure and negotiated a new collegiate agreement that created a defined-benefit pension plan that would benefit players significantly. For the next generations. “

“Don played an important role in reviving the Hockey World Cup in 2016. After COVID-19 forced the 2019-20 season to be suspended, Don led the negotiations that led to the extension of the collective agreement, in July 2020, that allowed the Stanley Cup playoffs to be played.”

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Phair has been criticized for his handling of the NHLPA’s sexual assault allegations made by Kyle Beach against the Chicago Blackhawks.

A 20-page review of an independent investigation commissioned by the union found no “individual wrongdoing or institutional failure of policy or procedure” by Fair or others in their handling of Beach’s allegations.