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'Falling Faces' series: Dennis is waiting for bariatric surgery, which always keeps getting away

‘Falling Faces’ series: Dennis is waiting for bariatric surgery, which always keeps getting away

We’ve often heard about unloading since the beginning of the pandemic, but its effects remain bare. Hospitals facing an acute shortage of resources, duty I decided to put words and faces for statistics. Today is the story of Dennis Billand who is waiting for bariatric surgery.

Since 2017, Dennis Byland has been waiting for bariatric surgery. For him, this intervention represents much more than just losing weight: it is a symbol of a fresh start and a healthier life. but the shed Which is currently rampant in hospitals is taking it a little further from its target.

“I know it’s not urgent, but it is a process that can change a person’s life,” says the teacher and restaurateur from Saint-André-d’Argenteuil in Laurentians. He is a father of three children, and he does not hide his eagerness to leave the extra weight that prevents him from carrying out family activities and enjoying life to the fullest.

“There are so many things I’ve wanted to do years ago. He talks about cycling, canoeing, kayaking, all the activities he can’t do at the moment because of his weight.

“When you don’t have obesity, you don’t realize how disabling it is,” he says. It restricts me in my daily and holiday activities. Just tying my shoes is the challenge. And not only do we suffer physically: it is very difficult to live with it on a social and personal level, but we do not talk about it much. »

At the age of 47, Dennis Byland has been battling his weight problem for over 20 years. But it happened gradually. “Beginning in my mid-20s, I gained between 10 and 20 pounds a year,” he explains.

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Over the years, he’s tried just about every diet. I tried keto [régime cétogène] Before it becomes popular, he laughs. Last on the list is intermittent fasting. It does not work. I was able to lose 10 to 15 pounds, but after that, I hit a plateau. And in my case, it’s an eternal plateau. This is where you start cheating and getting all your weight back…”

To (re)read: Our series Objects Shedding Loads

Believe it is possible

A few years ago he became more aware of the health problems associated with obesity. He saw his quality of life deteriorate. Then he decided to consult his doctor. Since 2017, he has been waiting for bariatric surgery.

“Bariatric surgery is not just a brace, it is what allows you to mark the beginning of a new lifestyle. It is what makes you believe it is possible.”

He is well aware that the operation will not solve everything and that he will have to put in efforts on a daily basis. “You have to change your lifestyle because my body will always try to gain that weight back. The surgery will help me control it, but if I don’t do my best and make a real life change, it will come back.”

Since 2017, he has had time to develop his thinking and present himself in the future. He admits that it is “part of the waiting process because there is psychological preparation to be done”. But in his case, the wait is extending beyond normal times due to the pandemic. Last June, after years of waiting, he was invited to a media meeting. Then, in September, he met the surgeon. “Normally, at this point, things go really fast. But the surgeon told me that under these conditions, it would take at least 6 to 9 months. And that was before Omicron arrived…”

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Dennis Billand gets the impression that he finally saw the finish line without being able to touch it. He is eager to achieve his goal. In short, “it will have an impact on my quality of life and will improve my longevity.”

Let’s see in the video