Awani Review

Complete News World

Colosseum benches take the road to the squares of Quebec

Colosseum benches take the road to the squares of Quebec

While the future of the Colisée de Québec is still being analyzed by the city, many seats in the legendary building will soon take the path of five adjacent squares.

Quebec City decided by the end of the year to replace the outdated seats in the squares of Michel Labady, Patrick Pauline and Regien Leimlin with seats from the former Pepsi Coliseh, a spokesman for David O’Brien confirms.

The Robert-Chevalier and Arpidrome center seats must also be replaced with the Colosseum seats for a total of 2,665 reused seats in various municipal sports facilities.

Those nostalgic for the runway will recognize its blue seats, which date back to 2006 and are still in great shape.

Since it closed in 2015, the city has sought to grant a second life to about 15,000 seats.

In the fall of 2019, 4,000 “antique” white chairs from the 1980s quickly found homes for residents.

In the case of 11,000 more modern seats remaining, the city has sold more than 3,422 municipalities and organizations to date. “There is a municipality in the process of buying 2,000 seats, and the sale of them still needs to be confirmed,” reveals Mr. O’Brien.

The city has also set aside some seats for its own needs. It is also evaluating the transportability of 2,420 to the Marcel-Bédard and Deux Glaces yards.

Ultimately, if all of the plans pay off, nearly all Colosseum seats, 14,507 above, will find a recipient.

Possible conversion

It remains to be seen what will happen to the building. On February 15, Mayor Regis Laboom hinted that he could be finally saved, even if the possibility of demolition was not ruled out. Then an internal committee was formed to study the various “transfer” scenarios.

See also  Bystanders at the Bell Center: Immunization and Equity Drive Public Health

The idea of ​​using it to host sports and entertainment was launched. Thinking continues.

“There is no room for demolition at the moment. “We have a project that we are currently analyzing,” Mr. Laboum’s press secretary, François Moissant, said Friday.