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A third dose of Pfizer vaccine may be required

A third dose of Pfizer vaccine may be required

The head of the US pharmaceutical giant said that people who received the Pfizer vaccine would “likely” need a third dose within six months to a year, and then likely an injection every year.

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Albert Burla, CEO of Pfizer, noted that “a reasonable assumption is that a third dose will likely be necessary, between six and twelve months, and from there there will be a vaccination again every year, but all this must be confirmed”, in the statements issued. Thursday by CNBC.

He added, “On the other hand, variables will play a major role.”

“It is very important to reduce the number of people exposed to the virus,” Burla said.

Earlier today, the Biden Administration’s anti-COVID cell director also stressed that Americans should expect to receive a booster vaccine in order to protect them from the spreading viral variants.

“We don’t know everything at this point,” admitted Dr. David Kessler, during a hearing before US parliamentarians.

“We are studying the duration of the antibody response,” he said. “It looks strong but it’s seeing a certain decline and the variations are challenging.”

“For logistical reasons, and for logistical reasons only, I think we have to consider that there might be a recall,” Kessler said.

The Pfizer / BioNTech Alliance had already announced in February that it was studying the effects of a third dose of its vaccine against variants in a clinical study.

This vaccine, which is given in two doses, uses an innovative RNA technology that has never been used before in real life, such as Moderna.

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At this point, these two vaccines are considered to be the best performers, with an efficacy of 95% for Pfizer / BioNTech and 94.1% for Moderna against COVID-19, according to clinical studies.